Allergy season

  An allergy is an overreaction of the immune system to a substance that’s harmless to most people. But in someone with an allergy, the body’s immune system treats the substance (called an allergen) as an invader and reacts inappropriately, resulting in symptoms that can be anywhere from annoying to possibly harmful to the person.

In an attempt to protect the body, the immune system of the allergic person produces antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE). Those antibodies then cause mast cells and basophils (allergy cells in the body) to release chemicals, including histamine, into the bloodstream to defend against the allergen “invader.”

It’s the release of these chemicals that causes allergic reactions, affecting a person’s eyes, nose, throat, lungs, skin, or gastrointestinal tract as the body attempts to rid itself of the invading allergen. Future exposure to that same allergen (things like nuts or pollen that you can be allergic to) will trigger this allergic response again. This means every time the person eats that particular food or is exposed to that particular allergen, he or she will have an allergic reaction.

Pollen is a major cause of allergies (most people know pollen allergy as hay fever or rose fever). Trees, weeds, and grasses release these tiny particles into the air to fertilize other plants. Pollen allergies are seasonal, and the type of pollen a child is allergic to determines when symptoms will occur. For example, in the mid-Atlantic states, tree pollination begins in February and lasts through May, grass from May through June, and ragweed from August through October; so people with these allergies are likely to experience increased symptoms during those times.

If your child suffers from hay fever or allergies and takes allergy medicine, it is best to be consistent (meaning take medication, eye drops, nasal spray) to keep symptoms at bay. When your child’s symptoms dissipate that is because the medication is working, but do not stop until you are sure they are over the worst of their allergic response. If you would like your child to receive allergy medication at school, I would be happy to administer it. Please send in a signed note with your child’s name, name of medication and when you would like them to receive it. You can also call or e-mail me.

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About tharrah

School Nurse, Peirce School, Arlington, Ma
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